Audit Representation

The IRS can audit tax returns for a variety of reasons including unreported and under reported income. An examination may be conducted by mail or through an in-person interview and review of the taxpayer's records. The interview may be at an IRS office (office audit) or at the taxpayer's home, place of business, or accountant's office (field audit). If the time, place, or method that the IRS schedules is not convenient, the taxpayer may request a change, including a change to another IRS office if the taxpayer has moved or business records are there. The audit notification letter tells which records will be needed. Taxpayers may act on their own behalf or have someone represent or accompany them. The auditor will explain the reason for any proposed changes. If the taxpayers do not agree to the changes it is necessary to argue for and substantiate the reasons for the acceptance of the return(s) as submitted. If the auditor does not agree with the argument and determines additional tax should to assessed, their is a right to appeal. Taxpayers who do not agree with the proposed changes may appeal by having a supervisory conference with the examiner’s manager or appeal their case administratively within the IRS, to the U.S. Tax Court, U.S. Claims Court or the local U.S. District Court.

Audit Reconsideration

An Audit Reconsideration is the process the IRS uses to reevaluate the results of a prior audit where additional tax was assessed and remains unpaid, or a tax credit was reversed. If the taxpayer disagrees with the original determination he/she must provide information that was not previously considered during the original examination. It is also the process the IRS uses when the taxpayer contests a Substitute for Return (SFR) determination by filing an original delinquent return.


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